Grief After Suicide: Finding Hope and Healing

Ideal Attendees

This workshop is geared towards people who are grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide, but will also be of value to those who wish to support a grieving survivor, and to professional care givers such as therapists and clergy who are working with survivors.

We are running two sessions of this workshop, one on June 27 in Hanford and another on June 29 in Porterville. These sessions will be identical. Interested attendees need only attend one session, but are allowed to attend both sessions if they wish.

Overview

The suicide of a loved one can have a profound and sometimes devastating impact on the family and friends left behind, called suicide survivors. Bereavement after suicide may entail high levels of disorientation, guilt, regret, anger, and trauma. Survivors also may struggle with the social stigma placed on suicide. Survivors can be at risk for elevated rates of complicated grief and suicidality themselves. All of this makes surviving the suicide of a loved one a potentially life-changing ordeal that requires all of the resilience that a survivor can muster, and all the support that family and community can provide. 

This workshop will draw on the presenter’s years of experience as a grief counselor specializing in work with suicide loss survivors to describe the remarkable pathways of healing that survivors can travel.  The presentation will cover topics such as the impact of suicide on individuals and the family as a group, some of the myths of grief recovery, things that survivors can do to help themselves, and when to seek professional help. The format will include didactic presentation, case examples from the presenter’s practice, and plenty of time for questions and answer with the audience.

 

Event Flyer

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Educational Goals

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify at least five common themes in bereavement after suicide.
  2. Identify common myths about the grieving process
  3. Describe principles of self-help for suicide survivors
  4. Recognize when professional help is needed in the grieving process after a suicide.

Fee

This presentation is fully funded by a joint effort between Kings County and Tulare County utilizing Proposition 63: the Mental Health Services Act. There are no fees or other costs for any attendee.

 

Schedule

We are running two sessions of this workshop, one on June 27 in Hanford and another on June 29 in Porterville. These sessions will be identical. Interested attendees need only attend one session, but are allowed to attend both sessions if they wish.

 

Session 1

Date: Monday, June 27, 2016

Time: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Location: Kings County Behavioral Health - Hope Conference Room, 460 Kings County Drive, Suite 101 (map)

Eventbrite - Grief After Suicide: Finding Hope & Healing

 

Session 2

Date: Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Time: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Location: Porterville City Hall - City Council Chambers, 291 North Main Street, Porterville, CA 93257 (map)

Eventbrite - Grief After Suicide: Finding Hope & Healing

 

Presenter

John (Jack) Jordan is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Pawtucket, Rhode Island where he has specialized in work with survivors of suicide and other traumatic losses for more than 35 years. He is the Clinical Consultant for Grief Support Services of the Samaritans in Boston, Massachusetts, and the Professional Advisor to the Survivor Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). He is Co-Chair of the Survivors of Suicide Loss Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. This Task force has recently released postvention guidelines for the United States, titled Responding to Grief, Trauma, and Distress After Suicide: U.S. National Guidelines (bit.ly/respondingsuicide). For over 30 years, Jack has provided training nationally and internationally for professional caregivers, and has helped to lead many healing workshops for suicide survivors. Jack has published over 50 clinical and research articles, chapters, and full books in the areas of bereavement after suicide, support group models, the integration of research and practice in thanatology, and loss in family and larger social systems. He is the co-author of four books: “After Suicide Loss: Coping with Your Grief – 2nd Edition” (2015 – self-published); “Grief After Suicide: Coping with the Consequences and Caring for the Survivors” (Routledge, 2011), “Devastating Losses: How Parents Cope With the Death of a Child to Suicide or Drugs” (Springer, 2012); and the newly published “Attachment Informed Grief Therapy” (Routledge, 2015).